past exhibition
Keith Walsh
WILL < / > WILL
01.9.15























Keith Walsh
WILL < / > WILL
January 9—31, 2015
Opening reception: Friday, January 9, 7—10 pm
Gallery hours: Saturdays and Sundays, 1-5 pm and by appointment
Closing reception: Saturday, January 31, 7—10 pm
Contact: Keith Walsh (424) 331-5231; adelmanwalsh@sbcglobal.net

Elephant is pleased to announce WILL < / > WILL an exhibition of new drawings and sculpture by Los Angeles based artist Keith Walsh. This work continues his exploration of American political and cultural history since the 1960’s, how the realms of speech, forms, and images of individuals associated with the challenges of social progress and justice may subjectively resonate today.

The activities of drawing, printing, and sculpting serve as autographic and labor intensive means for his processing of American history and realizing new possibilities. Language, abstract form, and representational images are lexical agents for creating a space for a reader’s interaction and, within a theory of composition itself, serve as metaphors for the multiplicities and tensions intrinsic to the evolution of a society.

Keith Walsh received his MFA from Tufts University. Recent shows include Long Beach Community College, For Your Art, Side Street Projects, Weekend, Dan Graham, The Beacon Arts Building, and the Santa Monica Museum of Art. His work has been reviewed in Artforum, Artweek, The LA Weekly, and The LA Times.
/Users/davidearle/Documents/Projects/Monte Vista/Users/davidearle/Documents/Projects/Monte Vista

past exhibition
Diana-Sofia Estrada
Traveling Without Doing Harm
11.24.14



Diana-Sofia Estrada
Traveling Without Doing Harm
Opening Reception Friday, November 24, 7-10 pm
Exhibition open Nov 22nd, 23rd, 25th, 29th
1-4pm, and by appointment, 213-500-7625

LA based artist Diana Sofia Estrada presents new work at Elephant. In this installation of work, Estrada focuses on traveling without doing harm. The term “ harm” is applied broadly, the idea being that whenever people travel, we leave or do something to the immediate environment or community. Traveling without doing harm is an impossible, but lofty, goal for one who wishes to be as respectful as possible to an area they are visiting… maybe.

Drawing upon Estrada’s experiences in travel, often being mistaken for a local, this body of work comments upon traveling as a source of “inspiration.” Using imagery she took while in Alexandria and Cairo, Egypt during the summer of 2009, she contrasts this with images taken while her parents were living in Alexandria during the January Revolution of 2011, known in the U.S.A. as part of the Arab Spring. Addressing issues of cultural insensitivity and voyeurism, Estrada’s works seek to record immediate reactions and considerations unto themselves, creating an installation of paintings and objects that voyeuristically contemplate beauty and change.

Estrada has also organized a group of artist performances that address the title of the show, “Traveling without doing harm” through the issues of identity/persona, urban planning, immigration, and capitalism. The artists are Joy Harris, Guan Rong, Henry Taylor, and Diana-Sofia Estrada. Performances start at 9pm on the night of the reception.

Artist Performances on Friday, November 24, 9pm
Traveling Without Doing Harm: Blunders and Mishaps
Joy Harris, Guan Rong, Henry Taylor, and Diana-Sofia Estrada

Diana-Sofia Estrada

Diana-Sofia Estrada received her BFA cum laude in Painting/Drawing and BA cum laude in Psychology from the University of North Texas. She received her MFA in Art from the California Institute of the Arts in 2008. Estrada’s work encompasses drawings, installations, and video to question every day expectations. Estrada has exhibited her work in FotoFest Houston, participated in DiverseWorks’ artist residency, The Real (Art) World both in Houston; in 2008, Estrada was an artist in residence at the Vermont Studio Center, and in 2009 she received the Arts for All Teaching Fellowship from the Los Angeles County Arts Commission. That same year she was a teaching artist in residence at the Bibliotheca Alexandria/ L’Atelier D’Alexandrie in Alexandria, Egypt. Estrada has exhibited her work internationally and nationally including Diaspora Vibe Gallery (Miami), Maniac Gallery (CA), Alice Yard Space (Trinidad), and at Artlab at the Smithsonian Hirschhorn Museum in Washington D.C. www.dianasofiaestrada.com

Joy Harris

Jeanette Joy Harris is an artist and writer who lives in Houston, Texas. She has had solo and collaborative works shown in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland, and Houston. Her work will also be shown in December at Miami Photo Salon, an exhibit associated with Miami Art Week. She has published work with TribTalk (editorial section of Texas Tribune), Glasstire, and Illusion. With a background in philosophy and politics, Joy has also presented academic work on the concepts of public space and action. Her blog www.duchampintheoffice.com connects “normal” people with contemporary art. @duchampintheoff

Guan Rong

Guan Rong as “Ms. Rachel” has been teaching art classes to children and youth in the San Gabriel Valley area since 2005. She adopted the name “Rachel” right after she graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with a BFA. Finding it difficult to be “Ms. Rachel” while teaching art and also attending CalArts, she left CalArts after a year of study in the MFA program. Being “Ms. Rachel” while teaching is her main source of income that supports her art making as Guan Rong. Guan Rong has exhibited and performed at the Armory Center for the Arts, Riverside Art Museum, The Velaslavasay Panorama, KCHUNG Radio, Rowland Contemporary (Chicago), and Blutenweiss (Berlin). Guan Rong makes paintings, films, books, performances, and radio shows with John Burtle. She recently participated with KCHUNG at the Made In LA 2014 at the Hammer museum.

Henry Taylor

Henry Taylor is a Los Angeles-based painter and sculpture who often makes portraits of his relatives, friends, neighbors, and anyone he feels connected to, if only briefly. His work freezes an intimate moment in time. Henry Taylor received his bachelor of arts from California Institute of the Arts and has had solo exhibitions at MOMA PS1, Santa Monica Museum of Art, and Studio Museum in Harlem. He has been included in numerous group exhibitions, including 2013 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Blues for Smoke, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Made in LA, Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, Los Angeles; Peres Projects, Berlin, Germany; and Body Language, Saatchi Gallery, London, England; Human Nature: Contemporary Art from the Collection, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles; 30 Americans, Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL and North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC. Taylor is included the collections of Saatchi Collection, London, UK; Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY; Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL; MoCA, Los Angeles, CA;MoMA PS.1, New York, NY. Taylor is represented by Blum and Poe in Los Angeles and Untitled in NYC.

past exhibition
Chris Niemi
Gravity Distended
10.4.2014



Chris Niemi
Gravity Distended
Opening Reception Saturday, October 4 2014, 7:00pm

Conflating mediums, worlds and systems, Chris Niemi challenges the known order of the world around us. Cross breeding the organic with the synthetic to discuss ideas of preservation, life and decay in her work, she invokes an otherworldly quality lending an alien nature to the organic. What is the experience of an object in the world? Niemi works with the particularities of objects, how an object is being protected, healed, or encouraged to grow. Pushing into the between spaces where nothing and everything is happening, she causes a hiccup that allows for new experiences. The object becomes more real, completely synthetic, unreal and even petrified.

http://chrisniemi.weebly.com/

Chris Cleo Niemi

past exhibition
Malisa Humphrey
A Guest, A Host, A Ghost
9.13.2014























Malisa Humphrey
A Guest, A Host, A Ghost
Opening Reception Saturday, September 13, 7-11pm

“A Guest, A Host, A Ghost” is a sculptural installation featuring new work by Los Angeles-based artist Malisa Humphrey. Working with the persistent aesthetics of colonialism present in Orientalist interiors, Humphrey looks at the continuing role of “the other” as established in literature and art. Beginning with an interest in the Jim Thompson House, a tourist destination in Bangkok, Humphrey examines the myth of the expatriate seduced and absorbed by a foreign culture. Jim Thompson, the American founder of the Thai Silk Company, first introduced the aesthetic commonly associated with Thailand to the United States and Europe. While the Jim Thompson House offers multiple theories on Thompson’s mysterious disappearance during a walk in the jungle, they never mention his role as an active CIA agent protecting U.S. interests in South East Asia during the Cold War.

Looking at the construction of “the other” in the works of Jim Thompson, Joseph Conrad, Somerset Maugham, Graham Greene and Rudyard Kipling, as well as these cultural producers’ personal relationships to and involvement in outside military interests and empire, “A Guest, A Host, A Ghost” suggests that their work is not a disguise for military involvement, but a parallel act, two distinct functions of the same operation.

Malisa Humphrey received her MFA from the University of California, San Diego in 2005. Her work has screened and exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, the Museum of Contemporary Art, La Jolla, the Hammer Museum, the Armory Center for the Arts and the Banff Centre for the Arts.

past event
Witch Show
Kiki Johnson and Alexa Loftus
8.29.2014




















Witch Show with Kiki Johnson and Alexa Loftus
Friday, August 29th, 8pm to 12:05pm

Join Kiki Johnson and Alexa Loftus to celebrate the release of their first episode of Witch Show, a podcast hosted by Kiki Johnson and Alexa Loftus that covers local LA witch news and other haunting topics. Where's the best place to take a centaur to brunch? Do witches really like cats? Are aliens even real? Are you an alien?
Witch Juice* and fog will be provided. 

*Beer

past event
RELEASE PARTY
William Gass, Sun Duel (Jason Triefenbach & Friends) and Barry Johnston
// closing reception
Tanya Brodsky
Firt there was. And then there was.
7.12.2014


RELEASE PARTY
Saturday July 12, 2014
8pm

Featuring
William Gass
Sun Duel (Jason Triefenbach and friends)
Barry Johnston
and closing reception for Tanya Brodsky: First there was. And then there was.


Elephant and Universal Love Upload are pleased to present RELEASE PARTY featuring William Gass, Sun Duel (Jason Triefenbach and friends), and Barry Johnston.

From psycho-theatrical vignettes fueled by primitive techno and urban decay to eloquent and minimal soundscapes, the artists of the Open Container Tour meld punk ethos with sound experimentation and collage sensibility to present open-ended and esoteric structures which rise and collapse in emotive oscillation: Abjection, Pleasure, and the Uncanny. We want to touch you… with colorful textures, fervent poetics, trance and transgression. Diatribes and exercise routines for disco mutants and discerning deviants.

We shall be released!

On the same night, Elephant presents the closing reception for First there was. And then there was, an exhibition of new works by Tanya Brodsky. This installation presents a space full of imminent problems. Things are (maybe) about to slide off, overflow, disintegrate, cause bodily harm if not approached with caution. Objects seem to be missing, with only the impressions made by their mass remaining as a record. The intentionality of the objects that are present is questionable. Things are simultaneously much more and much less stable than they appear to be. Contamination is a real concern. There is a dichotomy between permanence and impermanence, the utilitarian and the obtrusive, the mundane and the sanctified. It might all be a joke with no punchline.

Brodsky uses the acts of listing and categorizing to create the semblance of a disjointed narrative. The title of the show derives from narrative connectors: “first there was, and then there was.” Something happened, then something else, then something else. A appears to have led to B, to C, to D. Here, the indexical system is present as a framing device, something to push against. Logic sets up the possibility of red herrings, for the frustrations of not understanding or not solving. It acts as a foil for sex, madness, shit, humor, the mythical Furies, some kind of force of creation and destruction that is outside of and greater than the system.

Anticipation, excitement, dread, all require vulnerability: emotional, physical, or both. Trust is extended towards another being or eventuality, allowing him/her/it into one’s personal space. There is always a brief moment when it is unclear whether the stranger is leaning in in order to be violent, intimate, or both. Such an invasion elicits a physical response. The body tenses reflexively, bracing for fight or flight. Foreplay comes to mind. The erotic power of uncertainty, of waiting, not touching, not moving. In sexual and religious fetishes, art galleries, high end boutiques, the unavailability of the object gives it its power.

Tanya Brodsky (b. 1982, Kiev, Ukraine) lives and works in Los Angeles and San Diego. She received a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design in 2005. She is currently working towards an MFA at UC San Diego. Her work has been included in exhibitions in Los Angeles and New York. This summer she will participate in two traveling exhibitions in Monterrey, Mexico, and Bilbao, Spain.

past exhibition
Tanya Brodsky
First there was. And then there was.
6.8.2014























Tanya Brodsky
First there was. And then there was.
Opening reception Sunday, June 8, 5-9 pm


Elephant is pleased to announce First there was. And then there was, an exhibition of new works by Tanya Brodsky. This installation presents a space full of imminent problems. Things are (maybe) about to slide off, overflow, disintegrate, cause bodily harm if not approached with caution. Objects seem to be missing, with only the impressions made by their mass remaining as a record. The intentionality of the objects that are present is questionable. Things are simultaneously much more and much less stable than they appear to be. Contamination is a real concern. There is a dichotomy between permanence and impermanence, the utilitarian and the obtrusive, the mundane and the sanctified. It might all be a joke with no punchline.

Brodsky uses the acts of listing and categorizing to create the semblance of a disjointed narrative. The title of the show derives from narrative connectors: “first there was, and then there was.” Something happened, then something else, then something else. A appears to have led to B, to C, to D. Here, the indexical system is present as a framing device, something to push against. Logic sets up the possibility of red herrings, for the frustrations of not understanding or not solving. It acts as a foil for sex, madness, shit, humor, the mythical Furies, some kind of force of creation and destruction that is outside of and greater than the system.

Anticipation, excitement, dread, all require vulnerability: emotional, physical, or both. Trust is extended towards another being or eventuality, allowing him/her/it into one’s personal space. There is always a brief moment when it is unclear whether the stranger is leaning in in order to be violent, intimate, or both. Such an invasion elicits a physical response. The body tenses reflexively, bracing for fight or flight. Foreplay comes to mind. The erotic power of uncertainty, of waiting, not touching, not moving. In sexual and religious fetishes, art galleries, high end boutiques, the unavailability of the object gives it its power.

Tanya Brodsky (b. 1982, Kiev, Ukraine) lives and works in Los Angeles and San Diego. She received a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design in 2005. She is currently working towards an MFA at UC San Diego. Her work has been included in exhibitions in Los Angeles and New York. This summer she will participate in two traveling exhibitions in Monterrey, Mexico, and Bilbao, Spain.

past exhibition
Mountaineers: New Collages by Alice Clements
5.10.2014



































May 10 - June 5

Opening Reception: Saturday May 10th, 7pm-10pm
Additional Gallery Hours: Sunday May 25, 2-6 pm and by appointment

Elephant is pleased to announce an exhibition of new mixed media collages by Los Angeles based artist Alice Clements. With a raw and irreverent sense of materials, Clements uses paint to emphasize decisions made in mounting images on each other. Taking the most basic formula of collage as a starting place - an image glued onto a flat surface - she explores figure ground relationships, variations on landscape and subjects human, animal and neither.

Her Handsome Man Collages project began several years back. This body of work departs entirely from abstraction with painted forays into figurative representation, using images culled from popular culture, art history, and print media. The collages employ strategies of formal symmetry, sentimentality and wit to explore imaginary narratives and formal play.

Alice Clements received her MFA from Art Center College of Design, Pasadena in 2008. "Mountaineers" is her third solo exhibition in Los Angeles. Recent shows include University Art Museum at California State University, Long Beach, Jancar Gallery, Los Angeles, Long Beach City College, and Glendale College Art Gallery.

past exhibition
Scott Cowan & Katy Cowan
The Fifth Wall
4.11.2014























SCOTT COWAN & KATY COWAN
April 11, 2014; 7pm-11pm


The “fourth wall” is the proverbial division between entertainers and their audience. Recently, in a casual conversation, Katy and Scott mistakenly referred to this metaphorical division as the “fifth wall.” As their laughter settled, they began to wonder: if the fourth wall allows for one to suspend one’s disbelief, and temporarily—albeit from a distance—accept a fiction as an affective reality, what would a fifth wall represent? What would be its function?

After a few moments of conjecture and google-ing, they found that questions regarding the role of the fifth wall have varied answers. On the one hand, some argue that the fifth wall is the barrier between the critic and the practitioner (1); on the other hand, others hold that the fifth wall involves meta-marketing. (2) Further, some believe it refers to an instance when an artist fumbles, disrupting the scene: for the show to continue, both audience and artist must regain composure without halting the performative aspect of the event. (3)

Entertained by the spectrum of possible definitions, in THE FIFTH WALL Scott and Katy want to synthesize the commonalities between these definitions; they hope to use their understanding of the fifth wall to frame their work. Here, they believe the fifth wall involves revealing elements of an illusion without expecting resolution behind an illusion. Recognizing the space between artist, observer, and critic, Scott and Katy purposefully expose the structures of their work. Recollecting the fruits of their conversation, they now begin to ponder: perhaps the meaning of a work of art is not an intrinsic element, but is extrinsic and goal-oriented.

Their collaboration involves the necessary tension between interpretation and misinterpretation, that is, the fragility of the interpretability of a work of art. THE FIFTH WALL is their humorous attempt to seriously consider that a reality ‘behind’ an illusion can only ever be a reality in an illusion.

Please join!

(1) “What does ‘breaking the fifth wall” mean?,” Yahoo Answers, response from Eagle1388 posted three years ago, accessed March 10, 2014, http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110130155525AAZAk3R.

(2) Eugene Carr, Breaking the Fifth Wall: Rethinking Arts Marketing for the 21st Century (New York: Patron Publishing, 2011). Breaking the Fifth Wall is a self-published e-book available at Amazon.com.

(3) “Breaking the Fifth Wall,” Uncyclopedia: The Content-Free Encyclopedia, last modified January 21, 2013, accessed March 25, 2014, http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Breaking_the_fifth_wall.

past exhibition
home(-)free
Sofía Córdova and Megan Lindeman
3.14.2014




















home(-)free

March 14, 2014 - April 2, 2014


 Opening Friday, March 14, 2014, 7-10pm

Performance 9pm



“You want

Better cars

And a better heart

Another start

Yo' own yard

And a place to park

You wanna
Trust 'em ??”

-Trick Daddy, America



Elephant is pleased to present home(-)free, an exhibition of new works by Sofía Córdova and Megan Lindeman.
Córdova’s and Lindeman’s works both question the nature of freedom as it relates to American-ness. Questions of origin, outsider/insider status, belonging (and not belonging), political and historical patterns come together through photography, painting, video, sound and performance.
Lindeman’s project, My Freedom Is Too Big, uses the expansiveness of the Western American landscape as the backdrop for the proclamation of personal freedom. My Freedom Is Too Big began in 2011 at the start of the Arab Spring and presents a collage of abstracted images of protests in Tahrir Square alongside photographs of hand-painted banners floating over the open landscapes of California. The banners, which depict colorfully painted statements such as “My Freedom Is Too Big” and “I’d Like to Tell You Why,” are thrown in the air and photographed in California’s picturesque landscapes. Their depiction plays in contrast to most contemporary visual depictions of the fight for freedom -photographs of mass protests, police brutality, blood and violence-. Lindeman’s composite of abstracted protest imagery and the Californian landscape create a wallpaper of sorts, on top of she scrawls in crayon and gouache. The results resemble cave paintings, emphasizing the connection between the 30,000 year-old act of painting and the need for demonstration. In doing so, Lindeman points to a shared origin between this act of expression and the act of protest.
Lindeman also presents Whoa, You Guys Ok? (2011-2014), a sound installation consisting of an original song and painted text on paper encased in acrylic glass boxes. The song layers Egyptian rhythms, old American military marches, and marches from the Ottoman Empire, the oldest military marches known to man. The artist’s voice is heard in a call and response asking, “Whoa, you guys ok?” and responding with “It’s cool.” Together the works present a visual and auditory concern for the other and yet reveal in the artist’s placid response a sense of apathetic detachment associated with ‘freedom’ in the West.
Córdova presents work meant to exist in a speculative near-future, where the decline of suitable conditions for human survival has brought about the end of culture as we know it. National identities have been stripped away, placing everyone in a state of not-belonging. In the series, The Kingdom Is Me (2013-2014), Córdova uses black paint to redact photographic documents of our cultural past based on our historic present as a means of mapping out the physical and psychic landscape of this uncertain future. The three channel video, They Held Dances on the Graves of Those Who Died in The Terror (2013-present), made up of digital re-recordings of the projections of 8mm black and white films shot in Miami, Los Angeles and Puerto Rico, focuses on a fading natural world. Images of birds, tropical plants and atmospheric events become the records of the lost past in Córdova’s fantasy future. The accompanying music is a mash-up of the song Fantasia, cover of Mariah Carey, and Tom Tom Club’s Fantasy and Genius of Love. The song -- which also is a part of Act I of the performance Odas Al Fin De Los Tiempos (2012-present) -- describes a world in which dances are held on concrete slabs under a dying sun and human survivors are in constant peril not just from hostile conditions but from each other. Act II of Odas consists of original material written through the use of tarot cards (something Córdova does not know how to do) thus tying the installation and performance together as a provisional voice of divination. An excerpted performance will be done as part of the opening.
Sofía Córdova (b. 1985, Carolina, Puerto Rico) received her MFA from the California College of the Arts in San Francisco in 2010. She has performed at SFMOMA, SomArts and Southern Exposure among others. Her work has been exhibited at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, AMOA/Art House, Galeria de la Raza, Queen’s Nails, The International Center of Photography as well as other venues internationally. Her work is part of Pier 24’s permanent collection. She lives and works in Oakland, California.
Megan Lindeman (b. 1981, Tucson, Arizona) received her MFA from Claremont Graduate University in 2008 and her BFA from Rhode Island School of Design in 2003. Her work has been exhibited at Chime&Co., Los Angeles, CA; Coup de Ville, Artist Village WARP- Contemporary Art Platform, Sint Niklaas, Belgium; and The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, Omaha, NE. Her work has also been screened at the Beijing Film Academy, Modern Creative Media Academy, Quindao, China. She lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

upcoming exhibtion
Black Moon
Caitlin Foster and Kiki Johnson
2.8.2014






















February 8, 2014 - February 23, 2014
Opening Saturday, February 8, 2014, 6-10pm

Elephant is pleased to present Black Moon, featuring drawings by Caitlin Foster and paintings from Kiki Johnson.  The artists' create work with seemingly opposite methods; Johnson makes quick, succinct small paintings on panels, while Foster often labors for months on one large drawing.  Johnson's subject matter is culled from historical archives and books, lifting historical objects and figures to create an invocation of her own making.  Johnson's work serves to blur the distinctions between truth and fiction, past and present. Foster's detailed drawings are portals into a consideration of endless expanse and black holes.  Unidentifiable organic shapes are familiar and yet unplaceable in Foster's dense black and white meditations.  What is shared between the artists is the ritualistic act of making the work, of conjuring onto a blank surface.  Their work shares an interest in exploring the idea that image-making can take on revelatory properties, and the act of making becomes an integral part of the work itself.


Caitlin Foster (b. 1983) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.  She graduated from The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in 2006 and Tufts University, and also studied at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Foster has exhibited her work in San Francisco, New York, Chicago, Boston, and has an upcoming solo exhibition in Madrid, Spain.

Kiki Johnson (b. 1985) lives and works in Los Angeles, California.  Johnson received her MFA in painting from Yale University in 2012, and her BFA from California Institute of the Arts in 2007.  Her work has been exhibited in Los Angeles, Houston, and Halifax, Canada.  She was an artist in residence at the Vermont Studio Center.